One Fish Films Announces Production of New Episodic Pilot

(OIL CITY, PA) – Today, One Fish Films announced its plans to to shoot its first episodic pilot. The previously untitled project now has a title: “Circle, Michigan”. No immediate details about the plot are available, but it will be written, directed, and star One Fish Films’ Creative Director, Matt Croyle. One Fish films released the title card for the pilot upon the announcement.

Title Card for "Circle, Michigan"

Title Card for “Circle, Michigan”

Filming will take place this Winter, in Venango County, in western Pennsylvania. All media inquiries are to contact One Fish Films at: 814.319.5581 – or by email at: onefishfilms@gmail.com

 

Writer, Centerfold: Victoria James Joins The Cast Of POTENTIAL INERTIA

(OIL CITY, PA)  Author and Hustler Magazine Cover Model/Centerfold, Victoria James, has joined the cast of the low-budget, crowd-funded, independent drama “Potential Inertia”. She is featured in a cameo role written specifically into the script for her by writer/director Matt Croyle.

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Victoria James in POTENTIAL INERTIA

“She is someone who really has everything together,” stated Croyle. “She came up to Pennsylvania because she really wanted to be a part of our project. She is intelligent, focused, was very professional, and I’m very happy to have her on board with our film.”

She is currently pursuing her graduate degree, and resides in South Florida.

James is featured as the cover model and centerfold for the March 2014 issue of Hustler Magazine.

The film is being promoted for the 2014-2015 festival circuit.

Visit Victoria online at: www.missvictoriajames.com

More information about the film can be found at:

http://potentialinertia.onefishfilms.com
http://www.facebook.com/potentialinertia

2013 Year In Pictures

Helped Mike run for District Attorney.

Helped Mike run for District Attorney.

Played some piano.

Played some piano.

Had a wacky birthday weekend.

Had a wacky birthday weekend.

Technically became a "Republican".

Technically became a “Republican”.

Hit the headlines.

Hit the headlines.

Took over a Red Lobster with Billy and Adam.

Took over a Red Lobster with Billy and Adam.

Had a campfire with my friends.

Had a campfire with my friends.

Gave a guest lecture at my Alma Mater, Clarion University.

Gave a guest lecture at my Alma Mater, Clarion University.

Rocked out hard.

Rocked out hard.

Watched the Brody Block come down.

Watched the Brody Block come down.

Hit the headlines again.

Hit the headlines again.

Watched Adam become a streaker.

Watched Adam become a streaker.

Was dressed as a tin foil knight by Alayna.

Was dressed as a tin foil knight by Alayna.

Filmed Beth Ann's first radio appearance.

Filmed Beth Ann’s first radio appearance.

Helped Mike at our annual fireworks show.

Helped Mike at our annual fireworks show.

Jammed out with Rusted Root.

Jammed out with Rusted Root.

Watched my friends play softball.

Watched my friends play softball.

Had some photos featured on KDKA.

Had some photos featured on KDKA.

Hit the Allegheny.

Hit the Allegheny.

Filmed my friends in the studio.

Filmed my friends in the studio.

Continued work on my feature.

Continued work on my feature.

Hit up ALF with Eric and Courtney.

Hit up ALF with Eric and Courtney.

Reunited with some amazing people.

Reunited with some amazing people.

Shot a wedding with Jeremy.

Shot a wedding with Jeremy.

Had my own name-card.

Had my own name-card.

Shot in the freezing cold, in a cemetery.

Shot in the freezing cold, in a cemetery.

Spent Christmas Eve with the Hadleys.

Spent Christmas Eve with the Hadleys.

Met, and am getting to know Andrea, who is super-awesome.

Met, and am getting to know, Andrea — who is super-awesome.

Happy Holidays! – Audio Post


Finding The Monster Again – By Matt Croyle

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“Other Matt” in ‘Monster: Until I Can’t Breathe’

I’ve toyed with the idea of revisiting my web series ‘Monster‘. We’re all constantly, regardless of whether we want to admit it or not, looking inward to figure out exactly who we are – some more than others. ‘Monster’ enabled me to travel to Los Angeles in early 2012, was fun to shoot, and was such a productive and freeing way to let me share my feelings with everyone who watched. It was a very positive project for me in many ways.

As an ever-evolving person, change in my life is inevitable. The loss of my father really made me want to say something about it. ‘Monster’ seemed the most viable path to saying what I need to say – not only to myself, but to everyone else. An Epilogue episode was planned last month. I was reluctant to write, because I didn’t know exactly what, or how, to talk about what has happened to these faux-fictional characters in the past year. But, the other night, in a writing frenzy, I finished up a fifteen-page script that I hope says something to people. It felt good to write it.

We will launch the epilogue episode of ‘Monster’ this weekend. It’s entitled ‘Until I Can’t Breathe’. I hope you all enjoy it.

The episode will launch on the official ‘Monster’ Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/monsterseries

Please give the page a “like”, and thanks again for the continued support.

Sincerely,

Matt Croyle

From Script To Screen – Scene 26 – POTENTIAL INERTIA (Side by Side Comparison)

This is a side by side comparison of scene 26 from the upcoming feature film, POTENTIAL INERTIA, and the original draft of the script.

“It’s an interesting process when you’re both writing and directing a film. You come to realize that you could be an immense prick, and make the actors say the lines exactly as written (which in some cases wouldn’t make you a prick), or you could let your actors feel the lines out the way they want to – give them a little space to work,” said writer / director Matt Croyle.

He added, “This is a look at a rough cut of scene twenty-six along side the actual script. It’s kind of fun to watch.”

POTENTIAL INERTIA is scheduled to be released in early 2014, and is finishing up principal photography.

For more info, please visit the official site: HERE.

Matt, Why Must You Be So Open About Your Movie?

On the set of “Potential Inertia”.

Some people think it’s a game, making movies. Hollywood studios make it a game – a numbers game, a money game, a popularity contest. Sometimes the independent filmmakers, the folks making flicks outside of studios, make it a game too. Which, in itself, is all “fine and dandy” to protect your product, create suspense. I get it. Don’t give your flick away before your flick is ready. However, I’ve been getting a lot of flak recently from some folks – in the industry and not – about how I’m handling my picture (my first feature film) before it’s even completed.

I’ll get questions like: “Why are you releasing so many stills?” “Why do you have so many teasers out?” “Why is there a trailer before the film is finished?”

My answer? Because I can. And, not simply because I can, but because I want to. I want to engage with my audience, those people who are helping me make this picture through funding, being on set, spreading the word – those people should share in what the picture is becoming, and they should be able to see what it is becoming. I think the more open we are about our process, the more people will be willing to open their hearts and wallets to our film – if not now, then in the long run. Nobody likes a “snooty” filmmaker, and there are plenty of them out there to go around. I’m enjoying letting people learn the process of making a feature along with me, and if that inspires and/or helps someone make their first film then that’s just awesome. That’s icing on the proverbial cake. (I’m not sure if I just used the word ‘proverbial’ correctly, but I don’t care.)

It’s a lot easier to be open as an independent filmmaker than if I was to be, say, under a studio contract. That’s a total different ballgame. Sure, the money would be awesome, but it doesn’t let me engage an audience the way I would like to, with the content I would like to.

I been asked, “What do you think other independent filmmakers think about how you’re going about this?” I haven’t really been able to answer that question until now. My answer is: “I don’t care.” I’m sure some of them think it’s annoying, or that I’m “giving too much away”, or that I’m being too self-righteous; patting myself on the back. Sure, part of this flick is about me. It’s been mine since the get-go, but it’s ultimately everyone else’s when it’s done – and that’s what’s important.

So, I’m going to continue to do my best to be open with everyone as we push toward completion, and I hope everyone stays interested. Major thanks to those who have showed us support so far. We’re getting there, and we’re right there with you.

Check out our official site.

One Fish Films Releases First Full Trailer Of POTENTIAL INERTIA; Film Still Seeks Funding As Photography Draws Closer To Completion

OIL CITY, PA – One Fish Films has released the first full-length trailer for its upcoming feature Potential Inertia. as principal photography gets closer to completion, the film still seeks additional funding for post-production and festival submissions. The entire film is grassroots funded, with backers from all around the world located in eight different countries.

Every single backer will receive on-screen credit, and an IMDb credit. (IMDb credits will continue to be updated until post-production ends.)

To make a pledge (starting at $5.00) please visit: http://potentialinertia.onefishfilms.com

Check out the trailer below.

A Few Thoughts From A First-Time Feature Director On Making A No-Budget Independent Film

While we’re inching closer to wrapping principal photography on Potential Inertia, I’ve decided I would take a bit and discuss some things I’m learning, or have learned, throughout the process of making my first feature film.

Our picture is, pretty much, what the industry describes as a “no-budget” feature. Through crowdfunding we’ve acquired backers/producers from all over the world, but we’ve raised nowhere near the amount that I originally wanted for the picture’s budget – but, we’re getting it done anyway – because we want this picture made.

I AM NOT A FILMMAKER

I’m not quite sure I would call myself a “filmmaker”. If the act of simply making a film counts, then sure. But when I think of the term filmmaker, I think of people like Scorsese, Kubrick, Coppola, Russell, Soderbergh, Jarmusch, and the like. Sure, I’ve directed online shorts, an award-winning web series, and for the stage, but I’ve never made an actual feature film until now. Those guys are proven. I am not. I guess the real point I’m making is that I haven’t proven anything to myself, most importantly, as far as putting a feature film out into the world to live on its own. So, I’m going to think of myself not as a “filmmaker”, per se, but as a “documenter of my own experience”.

With that said, making a movie is hard. Very hard. Super-hard. It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done. And while I could be making the worst movie in the history of mankind (which isn’t actually true, because I saw a truly horrific full-length film online the other night which may qualify), the fact is I feel good doing it, and I know I’ll feel even better when it’s finally, as they say, “in the can.” Nobody tells you how hard it’s going to be. Well, some do, but it’s truly something you have to figure out for yourself – or with others straggling along with you on your exhausting journey to put a ninety-minute slice-of-life out to any kind of audience you can trick into mistaking your blood, sweat, tears, and intrinsic failure, for an actual “real” movie. Here’s the thing: As Kevin Smith puts it, “Every movie is someone’s favorite movie.” And, he’s right. So, you don’t have to be a “filmmaker” to make a movie. You just have to be willing to let yourself make a film.

HATERS GONNA HATE

One thing I’ve come to realize is that no matter who you are or what you do you will always have haters. In today’s age of technology, anyone can make a flick. Anyone. Seriously. Over the course, so far, of making this picture I’ve come to understand that the majority of my haters out there hate me because I am doing something they wish they could do, or had the support to do, but somehow they are not doing it at all. These people don’t even have to know anything at all about me, but they hate me with a passion.

The best words of encouragement I can give to someone dealing with all the hate is to acknowledge it, note it, and shake it off. Ultimately, those people who are not supportive of you have their own issues they need to deal with. And the best thing you can do for yourself, and your picture, is to keep that in perspective. The hate doesn’t have anything to do with you. Thousands of people are working on movies everyday, and they don’t hate them – they hate you. So, suck it up, brush it off, and shoot your flick. The old saying is true: “Haters gonna hate.”

SURROUND YOURSELF WITH LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE (Yes, even your friends.)

There’s always that old mantra to never do business with your friends. Horseshit. Your friends are the ones who still believe in you, even when they’ve seen what an idiot you can sometimes be. And, chances are, they are like you in their tastes. If you like art, they probably do too. These are the people who have held your hair when you puked, carried you to your front door when your broke your leg on the ice, bitched-out your ex for making you cry in front of your entire class. These people love you and want you to be successful, at least intrinsically for yourself. These are the people that have your back. Not having them around would be more of a handicap than having them there.

The same goes for people you are bringing into your little world that is your picture. They should be able to see the process, and your ideas as something they can get on-board with – even knowing that things will almost never go according to plan. The better someone is at their craft, and the more you surround yourself with them, the more they will push you to be better at yours. The great thing about these people is they will ultimately become your friends. You will bond, share histories, news, and make memories that you’ll always remember. This is a collaborative process, this making a film thing – so surround yourself with those people you trust, enjoy, and dedicate your time to making the best movie you can with them. If anything, you’ll always have something to talk about later in life.

“NEEDING” VS. “WANTING” – What to shoot.  (And being resourceful.)

The most important thing I’m learning, by making this flick, is that I can’t let anyone tell me that I can’t do it. Don’t ever let anyone tell you you can’t do something. That’s not up to them to decide. There are going to be plenty of times during production that you’ll look at yourself, your project, your cast and crew (or lack thereof), and you’ll want to pull your hair out. But you have to step back, and look at the big picture and be resourceful.

For example, one shooting day we had called for 100-150 extras for a scene. Four people showed up. Four. At first I, obviously, was mad, hysterical, and annoyed. But, after calming myself down a bit, I stepped back and really looked at what I “needed” to shoot as opposed to what I “wanted” to shoot. My story is a very intimate one. It’s about the central characters, not about how many people attended the graduation ceremony I was attempting to shoot that day. So, instead of “wanting” to shoot 150 people, I realized I only “needed” to shoot a handful – those involved in the story. With some careful camera placement, and some added sound, I was able to cut a scene that’s visually about the core participants, but it still sounds like there is 150 people present.

When you’re working with no budget, “wanting” something isn’t always an option, and maybe it won’t even make your story any better. You just have to be able to step back and realize that your picture isn’t always going to turn out exactly the way you want it, and will almost never be exactly what is on the page.

NOT EVERYONE IS GOING TO GET BEHIND YOU

Just as the haters will hate, not everyone you talk to or email is going to get on-board with your crazy little indie film idea. In fact, most people will tell you how cool an idea it is to your face, then blast away at their friends about it later. They’ll be willing to “help out” in any way they can, but then seem to fall off the face of the planet when you’re actually in need of a hand on set, or call for a bunch of extras. This will happen with the most organized of productions to the chaotic ones. Here’s the thing, though: You can’t expect them to. You can’t expect everyone to be excited about your project, your work (and some people will say it isn’t work because you’re not getting paid – or paid very little). They all have their own lives to live, and errands to run, and babies to feed. So, again, you have to suck it up and do the best you can with what you have.

I would say that 95% of directing this first feature of mine has been the art of problem-solving. The other 5% is the shooting, and the fun stuff. Whether it be logistics, scheduling, props, lighting, it’s solving problems that will consume most of your time. Not that all of those things are the director’s responsibility on larger-budget sets, but when you’re making your first feature I think it’s imperative that the director take on most of the responsibility them self. Why? Because I think it’s a great learning process for future projects if you take responsibility for the things that don’t work, and take the praise for the things that do. This way, your first picture is truly, undeniably, yours.

I’d like to close this article by saying that I’m so very grateful for the support we’ve had, and continue to have, on my first feature film. I’m learning as I go, and it’s a very humbling experience creating a world for everyone to come visit for while. I’m also very proud of everyone involved. It’s taking us a while to finish our project, but I hope when we do it’s not too much of a disappointment to audiences. I’m proud of what we’re putting together, and I guess that’s really the most important thing – I’m creating something together, with a bunch of like-minded people, who share a love for telling a story.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO MAKE A PLEDGE TO OUR FILM, PLEASE VISIT: http://potentialinertia.onefishfilms.com

COPYRIGHT (C) 2013 Matt Croyle. All Rights Reserved.

Ricci Hardt “Kick It With You” Video World Premiere

OIL CITY, PA – One Fish Films released the world premiere of Ricci Hardt’s ‘Kick It With You’ music video at Midnight today to help promote the upcoming album release of Ricci Hardt.  For more info, please visit Ricci Hardt online at http://www.riccihardt.com

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